Light Hearted

Light Hearted Redux: Episode 7, Nick Korstad, Big Bay Point Lighthouse, Michigan; Erin Corra, Lime Liln Lighthouse, Washington.

This episode of Light Hearted was originally released on June 24, 2019. It features two interviews — Nick Korstad, owner of the Big Bay Point Lighthouse Bed and Breakfast in Michigan, and Erin Corra, founder and executive director of the Friends of Lime Kiln Society, stewards of the Lime Kiln Lighthouse in Washington. Also featured is a segment on Cordouan Lighthouse — the oldest lighthouse in France, known as the Lighthouse of Kings and the Versailles of the Sea.

You can listen to the episode with the player below, and the complete transcript follows.

JEREMY

You are listening to Light Hearted, the official podcast of the United States Lighthouse Society. My name is Jeremy D’Entremont. We are here in world famous study room three of the Portsmouth Public Library on the historic New Hampshire Seacoast. And with me today is Michelle Jewel Shaw — photographer, teacher, and volunteer of friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouses. Thanks for being back with me today, Michelle. How’s the lighthouse season going so far?

MICHELLE

It’s going really well so far, Jeremy. We’ve had three tours so far and lots of wonderful visitors to the lighthouse. The second week of tours, we were joined by the Piscataqua Rangers Junior Fife and Drum Corps, which added lots of entertainment to our open house that day.

JEREMY

Yeah, that was pretty cool. I enjoyed seeing that. Of course you were stuck over by the base of the lighthouse. You didn’t get to see them real well, but I had fun watching them march around.

MICHELLE

It was nice to listen to them as well. I could hear them very well from the base.

JEREMY

Yeah, they were a lot of fun. And people can actually look on our Facebook page, the Friends of Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouses Facebook page, and see some videos of that drum and fife corps. The young students, young kids actually, playing fife and drum. And they were surprisingly good.

A little later in today’s edition of Light Hearted, we’re going to hear from Erin Cora of the Friends of Lime Kiln Society in Washington State about an event that’s coming up soon. Also in this episode, and in the episode we’ll be posting later in the week, we’re going to hear my interviews with people at two different lighthouses where the public can stay overnight. Lighthouses with overnight accommodations have a greater advantage – it’s a really a good way for a lighthouse to be self-supporting. Have you stayed overnight in any lighthouses, Michelle?

MICHELLE

I haven’t yet, Jeremy, but I definitely plan to in the very near future. Do you have any favorites that you could recommend to me?

JEREMY

Well, I’ve stayed at a few, but I have to admit that I’ve probably stayed overnight at more lighthouses because I was taking part in paranormal investigations than actually to sleep at them.

MICHELLE

That sounds, that sounds like a pretty eventful evening spent at a lighthouse.

JEREMY

Yeah. Maybe we can get into that in a future edition of Light Hearted, but I’ve slept at a few lighthouses, too. In fact, I’ve slept a couple of times at the Point No Point Lighthouse in Washington, which is the headquarters of the U.S. Lighthouse Society. That’s a great place to spend a few nights. The interview we’re going to listen to in a few minutes is with Nick Korstad, the owner of Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan. I have not stayed there yet, but I’m hoping to have that opportunity at some point. Michelle, please help me tell our listeners more about Big Bay Point Lighthouse and Nick Korstad.

MICHELLE

Why, certainly Jeremy. Big Bay Point Lighthouse stands on a bluff on Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, about 24 miles northwest of Marquette on Lake Superior. The building includes a two-story brick keeper’s house with an attached 60-foot tower that puts the light 105 feet above the lake. The light went into service in 1896, originally with a three and a 3 ½-order Fresnel lens. There was also a fog signal building with a steam-operated foghorn. The light was deactivated in 1961 and the property was sold into private ownership. The first private owner was John Pick, a plastic surgeon from Chicago who bought the property for $40,000. Dr. Pick spent 17 years renovating the lighthouse, which was in terrible condition after being abandoned for some years. Later owners turned the lighthouse into a bed and breakfast inn in 1986. The new owner since May 2018 is Nick Korstad.

JEREMY

Prior to purchasing Big Bay Point Lighthouse, Nick bought and restored Borden Flats Lighthouse in Fall River, Massachusetts, a project for which he was featured on several national TV shows and received a Keeper of the Light Award from the American Lighthouse Foundation. Nick is also the owner of the historic Spectacle Reef Lighthouse in Lake Huron, Michigan. I spoke with Nick Korstad on the phone this past March, and we’re going to listen to that conversation now.

MUSICAL INTERLUDE

JEREMY

Thanks so much for joining me today, Nick.

NICK KORSTAD

Thanks, Jeremy, for having me on.

JEREMY

So Nick, it must be a very pleasant relief to be running a lighthouse B and B on the mainland instead of one out in the middle of the water like you used to do at Borden Flats. So how are you enjoying life at the Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan?

NICK KORSTAD

I’d have to say it’s been a lot more fun than dealing with an offshore lighthouse. I almost feel like I’m semiretired now, not having to have the boat, and the schedule, and the licensing that was required by the Coast Guard. But the view here is amazing. So I wake up every morning, I’m making breakfast, I’m looking out at all the wildlife, the forest, the lake, and sometimes I have to kind of pinch myself to see if I’m still in reality. But I have to say that this beats the offshore lifestyle by more than a hundred percent.

JEREMY

Although I should point out that we’re actually recording this on—let’s see, today is March 3rd. And when we started today, before we started recording, you told me that you’ve had more than 200 inches of snow this winter, which is a little different from Borden Flats and Fall River, Massachusetts. So you have had something new to deal with, with all that snow, which has made life interesting this winter.

NICK KORSTAD

Yes, definitely. And it’s something—I now know how to use a snowplow, a snowblower and every kind of snow shovel that was invented. And what was funny, it was my first year in New England was one of the warmest years. It was 2011, 2012. And I think we got three inches of snow, but then that followed by, I think it was 2014, where we had like 150 inches of snow that winter. And so it has followed me here for this first year.

Nick Korstad at Borden Flats Lighthouse

JEREMY

Yeah. Well, you did have a lot of challenges with Borden Flats Lighthouse, no doubt about it, being surrounded by water. It’s always under assault from the ocean and the elements. You have obvious challenges including the snow and weather, at Big Bay Point Lighthouse. So, can you say a little bit about what challenges are similar with Big Bay Point and what challenges are different there?

Nick Korstad

NICK KORSTAD

I’d say my main challenges I had with Borden Flats that I have here was the climate change. And I know a lot of people don’t see climate change as a factor, but at Borden Flats it was the sea level rising. And, you know, that lighthouse had that lower foundation that had been added after the ‘38 hurricane. And what we’re facing here is that our lake levels are at historically high levels. And we sit on a cliff overlooking the lake. And even though the cliff is mostly rock at the base, the waves and everything they’re driving into the sandstone are slowly creeping that cliff a little bit closer to the house. And so that’s something that I’m having to look at this year and study the cliff. You know, we’ve taken down all the trees so that it’s not causing any erosion from wind and rocking. But I’d say that’s the biggest problem I’m going to be facing in the future is keeping erosion at bay. That’s always a challenge with, I guess, any lighthouse. They’re always built in a remote location and the most, you know, sought out fringe that they could put it on.

JEREMY

So can you tell our listeners a little bit more about what they can expect if they book a stay at the Big Bay Point Lighthouse B and B, which is a, we haven’t actually said it, but it is open year round. What are the accommodations like there?

NICK KORSTAD

So here we have seven guests rooms. We have three of our large keeper rooms that have fireplaces and our rooms are a lot larger than a typical hotel room. So when they did separate — the house used to be a duplex, so they can joined into one large home. So all our rooms have their own bathrooms, private spaces, and I’m in the process of renovating all the rooms. So most of our rooms will have couches, seating areas, queen size beds. It’s all brand new bedding. And, most of our rooms actually look right out onto Lake Superior now. And I cook a full breakfast for everyone in the morning. I’ll make them snacks, cookies, brownies in the evening. And then I’m around, I’m out, you know, getting the grounds going, gardening, and I’m here to answer questions. I’ve had a lot of people that are repeat guests. They’re kind of excited that I actually make them breakfast now, whereas at Borden Flats you had to bring everything in, do it yourself. So you can expect quiet, lots of nature. We do get northern lights out here, and we have amazing sunrises and sunsets.

JEREMY

You say lots of nature — any particular wildlife that people are likely to see there?

NICK KORSTAD

We’ve had bear in our yard. You can see moose, deer, elk. We have a porcupine that lives on site. Lots and lots of birds. I’ve seen cardinals. I saw an indigo bunting, which I guess is not a common bird here. So it’s kind of showing how weather patterns are changing and we’re getting different bird species We have sandhill cranes that are in the area and they’re almost prehistoric looking. They’re like tall as you are.

JEREMY

 I’ve seen them in zoos.

NICK KORSTAD

They look at you and you’re like, “Holy moly, what the heck is that?”

JEREMY

Wow, they are big.

Big Bay Point Lighthouse, USLHS photo by Mike & Carol McKinney

NICK KORSTAD

It’s kind of like the Alaska of the Midwest where it’s just, it’s so cool to see all this type of stuff, you know, living in new England, it’s kind of like, cut all the trees down and there was no wildlife left — and to come here and go out in the yard… We have two active eagles that fly over the lighthouse on a daily basis. So that’s the stuff that, you know, you feel blessed to be able to be here and see it.

JEREMY

A little bit different from Fall River, Mass., for sure.

NICK KORSTAD

And they’re tearing down those cooling towers too this year. So that would be a good thing for if you guys decide to go and stay at the Borden Flats Lighthouse.

JEREMY

Now are there any special deals at Big Bay Point you might like listeners to know about?

NICK KORTAD

Yeah. So any listeners that listen to this podcast, if they call me and let me know that they’re listening, drop Jeremy’s name. I will give them 15% off their stay.

JEREMY

Aha. Okay.

NICK KORSTAD

They have to mention Jeremy’s name.

JEREMY

Okay, so let’s repeat that. So, if listeners contact Nick at the Big Bay Point Lighthouse B & B, they have to mention my name, Jeremy. They might have trouble with my last name, which is D’Entremont. So it’s okay if they say they heard on the U.S. Lighthouse Society podcast, which is called Light Hearted. They heard Jeremy say they can get a discount if they mention me. So they don’t need to say D’Entremont. Right. They can just say, uh, Jeremy is good enough. Is that, is that okay?

NICK KORSTAD

Yeah. Jeremy is great. You know, they might get an extra percent if they can pronounce your last name correctly.

JEREMY

Okay. And if they pronounce it with the French accent, that’s even better, ‘cause I don’t even bother doing that. But anyway, so what about people who are visiting the area, but they may not be in the market for an overnight stay at your lighthouse. Can they visit the lighthouse and get a tour of the lighthouse if they’re not staying overnight? Is that possible?

NICK KORSTAD

Yeah, so we have our grounds open daily, starting at 10:00 a.m. And I have a local girl that comes — she should be getting out of school around the 1st of June. And so we try and offer daily tours June through October. And we start around noon until about four o’clock when check-in is, and it’s usually first come, first served. We take up to five people at a time. We take them through the keeper’s house and then all the way up to the top of the tower. And this summer we’ll be working at getting our third-order lens, which we own, back into the lighthouse. So we’re hopefully going to plan a relighting ceremony, maybe this October.

JEREMY

Oh, that’s great. Congratulations on that.

NICK KORSTAD

Yes, I’m lucky.

JEREMY D’ENTREMONT

Yeah. Well, that’s fantastic. Anything else before we conclude this conversation? Anything else you’d like to tell our listeners about the Big Bay Point Lighthouse Bed and Breakfast?

NICK KORSTAD

If you’ve ever want to say in a bed and breakfast, we offer a site that has been untouched, so we’re not surrounded by homes. We still have all of our original buildings aside from our barn. So when you look out at the property, look out at Lake Superior, you’re seeing it as it was when there were lighthouse keepers out here. I know a lot of lighthouses that you travel to, they have that picture that you see on every calendar and you get there and you turn every direction. You’re like, oh my gosh, you know, the corporate world has just embarked on this lighthouse. But when you get here, you come up the driveway and you don’t see anything but what you were meant to see when, you know, you’re the light housekeeper.

JEREMY D’ENTREMONT

Sounds good to me. And how can people, what’s the easiest way for them to get more information online?

NICK KORSTAD

Yeah, easiest way is just from our website, BigBayLighthouse.com. And we’re in the process of upgrading our website right now. So it should be launched up by the summer with all new pictures and everything.

JEREMY

Excellent. Well, Nick, thank you so much. And I know we’ll be talking more in the future and we’re talking about the possibility of me making a visit there in the future. So I hope we’ll be talking in person at that point, maybe in the fall. So thanks so much for spending time with me today. I really appreciate it.

NICK KORSTAD

Yeah. Thank you so much.

JEREMY

Thanks Nick.

MUSICAL INTERLUDE

MICHELLE

And now it’s time for our lighthouse history segment. For several episodes of this podcast we’ve been talking about some of the world’s oldest lighthouses that are still in existence. Today we’ll be talking about the Cordouan Lighthouse in France, which was built between 1584 and 1611.

JEREMY

Not only is the Cordouan Lighthouse the oldest lighthouse in France and one of the oldest in the world, but it’s the tenth tallest masonry lighthouse in the world at 223 feet. It’s been called the Lighthouse of Kings and the Versailles of the Sea.

MICHELLE

The lighthouse is located on a small island near the mouth of the Gironde estuary off the west coast of France, about seven kilometers or 4.3 miles offshore. Although there have been minor beacons on the site, the first two lighthouse was built by order of Edward, Prince of Wales. The 48-foot tower had a wood fire on top maintained by a hermit, and the lighthouse was financed by a tax paid by passing ships. The structure was in bad condition by the late 1500s, leading to the construction of the lighthouse that still stands today.

JEREMY

The new lighthouse was designed by the leading Paris architect Louis de Foix, and is considered a Renaissance masterpiece. De Foix designed a wide base, 135 feet in diameter, to withstand the constant onslaught of the sea. The lighthouse originally stood four stories above the base for a total height of 162 feet, and included apartments for four keepers and a chapel in its third level. The light was produced by burning oak chips in a metal container. It was first lighted on June 11, 1611. By 1664, the fuel was changed to whale oil,

MICHELLE

Early illustration of Cordouan Lighthouse; USLHS archives

To increase the light’s visibility, nearly two centuries after its construction Louis the 16th ordered that the tower be raised to its present height of 223 feet in 1790. In 1823, one of the earliest Fresnel lenses was installed in its lantern. The lighthouse was restored in 1855, and it was made a historical monument in 1862, the same year as the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris. It was converted to electricity in 1948 and it was automated in 2006.

JEREMY

There are still two resident keepers, but they are employed mostly to serve as tour guides, “It’s the sea that lulls us to sleep at night,” said one of the recent keepers, “and it’s the sun that wakes us up in the morning. We live with the moon because it pushes back the tides. To work in a lighthouse is great,” he said.

MICHELLE

The lighthouse is open to the public from Easter to November 1, only at low tide. There are excursion boats that take visitors to Cordouan from several locations. The captain of the vessel tries to land passengers as close as possible to the lighthouse but there’s usually a 15 to 20-minute walk required, and visitors may find themselves wading up to thigh-deep in water, and sometimes walking on slippery rocks.

JEREMY

And once you make it to the lighthouse tower and its monumental entrance door, there are 311 steps to get to the top. One website advises, “Bear in mind that you are visiting a site unlike any other in the world, one that offers a new experience with every visit.” There are a number of websites with information, although most of them are in French. But if you Google Cordouan Lighthouse, you’ll find plenty of information in English.

MICHELLE

Next time we’re going to talk about one of the most famous lighthouses in the world, Eddystone light in England. Next we want to tell you about a celebration that’s coming up in the Pacific Northwest on Sunday, June 30th.

MUSICAL INTERLUDE

JEREMY

The San Juan Islands are an archipelago in the state of Washington known for their landscapes and wildlife. Lime Kiln Point State Park, on the west side of San Juan Island, is considered one of the best places in the world to view wild orcas.

MICHELLE

Other attraction in the park is the Lime Kiln Lighthouse. The lighthouse overlooking Haro Strait was built in 1919. It’s a 38-foot octagonal concrete tower attached to a fog signal building. It was the subject of an article by Elinor DeWire in the winter 2019 issue of the U.S. Lighthouse. Society’s quarterly journal, the Keeper’s Log.

JEREMY

I had an opportunity to speak on the phone with Erin Corra, founder and executive director of the Friends of Lime Kiln Society, about that event that’s coming up. Let’s listen to that conversation.

MUSICAL INTERLUDE

JEREMY

Thank you so much for speaking with me today, Erin. I appreciate you talking with me.

ERIN CORRA

You’re welcome.

JEREMY

So first, why don’t we talk a little bit about the basic history of Lime Kiln Lighthouse? Maybe we could start with where the name of the lighthouse comes from.

ERIN CORRA

Yeah, Lime Kiln Point, actually the initial industry there was the limekiln operation where the limestone was mined out of the hillsides and the island there. And there’s a full operation for close to 90 years there, starting in the 1860s and then kind of wrapped up around the 1950s. So the lighthouse popped in there midway through. And so that’s kind of how that whole area got named. It was after the lime kiln operation that occurred there.

JEREMY

And the lighthouse was of course built in 1919, right?

ERIN CORRA

Exactly. Yeah. In 1914 is when it was first established as a light station and there was a small beacon that was put there. But then by 1919, actually June 30, 1919, the main lighthouse that still is there now, was built and lit by June 30 in 1919. So that’s what makes this such a special year in 2019. So we can celebrate the fact that it’s a hundred.

JEREMY

Right. Anything else significant about the history of Lime Kiln Lighthouse you’d like to tell us about?

ERIN CORRA

Yeah. Well, by 1951 the island finally got electricity and reached its way out to Lime Kiln Point as well. So they finally got electricity out there. And then by 1962, the lighthouse was fully automated. So the lighthouse keepers and the keepers’ assistants and their families were no longer as needed there. There were still keepers there, but not to the degree is before. And now the keeper’s quarters are housing the state parks employees and volunteers. So they’re still nicely lived in, but not quite the same as back in the day.

JEREMY

Now let’s talk about the celebration that’s happening on June 30. Obviously the reason is that it is the centennial of the first lighting of the lighthouse. So tell us about what’s going to happen. Looks like there’s quite a bit happening at the celebration.

Lime Kiln Lighthouse, USLHS archives

ERIN CORRA

Yeah, yeah. We definitely pick June 30, 2019 just because it is exactly a hundred years later from the initial lighting. And so we’re really excited about the fact that it lands right on a Sunday and it’s right in a good time of the year for us, too. So everyone’s coming here for the 4th of July celebrations that happen. So it’s going to be a really busy weekend, but having it on a Sunday afternoon and evening is perfect and we’ve got a Coast Guard admiral that’s going to come and give a keynote as well as a park commissioner from Olympia and our own area manager – park area manager — coming to be a part of it. And our mayor from Friday Harbor, he’s going to be offering some kind words in support of what we do at the park and how the lighthouse is inspiring. And then also our very own favorite lighthouse queen, Elinor DeWire, who is going to be there and offering some fun anecdotes and stories. And likewise Chad Kaiser, a wonderful expert in our local area that helps run the new Dungeness Lighthouse Station as well. So he’s coming up and going to be part of the festivities.

So that’s going to be between three and five p.m. when we want to have the keynote and all the sharing going on in that regard. And then from about 5:00 p.m. on we’re going to have music, local musicians, Dana Lyons, a local musician from Bellingham that’s well known in the area and some other really fun, local, tunes going on just to kind of fill the air for us. And we’ll also

be doing some tours to the top of the lighthouse and offering fun stories there about our love and inspiration with the lighthouse.

And then another really fun part is we’re going to have more like community booths. So different community organizations — the theme is past, present, and future partnerships for the park and the lighthouse. So we’re seeing the ones we already have, opening up to new partnerships. The lighthouse in the park is an amazing platform for education, stewardship, and inspiration for all. We’ve got 350,000 people from 40 different countries that visit the park annually and primarily, you know, June through September. So the more we can kind of partner up with different organizations, the better as a wonderful platform for the community and really the world, it’s such a destination. So I’m just really wanting to bring that element in. And we all love the lighthouse and the lighthouse is iconic in the community at large, as well as the state.

So just wanting to see that as an opportunity for people to come celebrate that way. And we’re also going to have our interpretive center open with our gift shop. We have a special anniversary wine label with a local winemaker here, Mike Sheridan with Mike’s wine bar. And, yeah, I really am hoping we can also pull together the culinary community here on the island and do a special edible lighthouse contest where if it’s food and it looks like Lime Kiln lighthouse, throw it out on the table. And they have voting and they have some fun with that and celebrate with our taste buds a little bit.

Yeah. And then we’re going to also have some live art and a fun kiddo zone where, where we can have different organizations show a little bit more about the wildlife and the fun critters that we live with here on the island and do some show and telling there. And also definitely bring some more art into the park. And we have a beautiful poster that was made by one of our own board members, Pamela Hoke. And so she’s going to be there doing some live art, and we’re going to just have some crafty stuff going on for kids and families to come and enjoy as well.

JEREMY

Wow. That sounds like a really great event. There’s so much going on. I actually didn’t realize that two friends of mine, Elinor DeWire and Chad Kaiser will be there as part of the event. I’m sure people will love meeting them and hearing them speak. They’re both wonderful, great, great lighthouse people. So that’s wonderful to hear. So it sounds like a fantastic event. And again, when does the event get started on June 30?

ERIN CORRA

June 30, 3:00 p.m. is when it kind of kicks off and then it really is going to go all the way through to sunset. And I’ve also spoken with a lot of the different mariners in the area. We’re going to have the county sheriff boat go by. We’re having a little bit of a boat parade whenever the boats can come on by the lighthouse and show off their, their waterworks or blast a cannon or anything like that, just kind of commemorate our beautiful beacon. And that’s of course, if the whales are not visiting at the same time also. We’re hoping that our favorite finned friends will be coming by and sharing the celebration energy as well.

JEREMY

Oh, that would be great. So if we could just maybe finish up here, there’s a website. I know we want to mention that. I actually have it right in front of me right now. It’s kind of a long address to tell people, but if they, if they Google the Lime Kiln Point Lighthouse, centennial celebration, I’m sure they’ll find it very easily. But there’s a website that lists all the events that are going on. There’s probably a Facebook page as well. I would imagine that has a lot of information about it as well. Is that right?

ERIN CORRA

Yeah. Yep. And Jeremy, actually, our website URL has shortened. If people actually go to FOLKSSJI.org that actually will get them to our website and they can find our information and Facebook page and links to all kinds of things from there. And obviously any Google search with the Lime Kiln Lighthouse centennial will come up with all kinds of fun information and also more specific kind of updates regarding the event as we grow closer to it.

JEREMY

Okay. And would you like to add something more about the Friends of Lime Kiln Society? Obviously you do more than just the lighthouse, is that correct?

ERIN CORRA

Yeah. Well, it’s park-wide and community-wide really. I started FOLKS, Friends of Lime Kiln Society in 2011, when a lot of the budget cuts were eliminating different positions and programs in the parks. So that was basically something that I was already operating and helping in the park as an interpreter specialist. And so a group of volunteers in the community and myself just got together and made a plan to continue to keep the interpreter center open and the programs and the volunteer efforts alive in the park through private funding. And mainly the gift shop and the interpreter center is our operating budget, along with different fundraising efforts and grants. But yeah, it’s really a community-based organization and getting the manpower and the park to deepen that connection with all the visitors coming from around the world, to this place that we love and really building a stewardship message and trying to just build that connection anywhere and everyplace we can.

JEREMY

Well, that’s great. And just to wrap things up, I’ll just say one more time that I hope you have a great turnout. I’m sure you’re going to have a great turnout and such sounds like such a fantastic event on June 30th. So I wish you all the best with that. I want to thank you for spending time with us today. Thank you, Erin Corra, the founder and executive director of the Friends of Lime Kiln Society, FOLKS. Thank you so much.

ERIN CORRA

Absolutely. Thank you so much, Jeremy.

MUSICAL INTERLUDE

JEREMY

And now it’s time for a trivia question. The first two people to answer the following question correctly will win prizes. Okay, Michelle, what is today’s question?

[NOTE: The contest is now closed.]

MICHELLE

Here is the question. Before he bought Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, what lighthouse in Massachusetts did Nick Korstad buy and restore? Again, before he bought Big Bay Point Lighthouse in Michigan, what lighthouse in Massachusetts did Nick Korstad buy and restore?

JEREMY

If you’ve been listening carefully to this edition of Light Hearted, you should know the answer to that question. The first person to answer correctly gets a 2019 U.S. Lighthouse Society calendar with beautiful photos by talented U.S.L.H.S. members. The second gets a lighthouse illumination DVD, which takes you on a tour through the history of lighthouse illumination.

MICHELLE

Send your answer in an email to jeremy@uslhs.org. Be sure to say that you are answering the trivia question in Light Hearted episode seven, and again, send it in an email to jeremy@uslhs.org.

JEREMY

That’s jeremy@uslhs.org. And again, the first two people to answer correctly will win prizes.

MICHELLE

That’s it for another edition of Light Hearted. We want to thank the staff at the Portsmouth Public Library, and thanks to the staff, volunteers, and members of the U.S. Lighthouse Society. To learn more about the U.S. Lighthouse Society and all of the great tours they offer, visit the website at uslhs.org. You can also visit their social media pages on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

JEREMY

I want to mention a new feature on the USLHS website, the J. Candace Clifford research catalog. It premiered in May, and is the largest collection of information on lighthouses in the U.S. currently available on the internet. I strongly urge you to check it out again at uslhs.org

Speaker 2 (32:37):

MICHELLE

And hello to everyone in the Friends of New England Lighthouses Facebook group.

JEREMY

And I also want to thank our guests we had today, Nick Korstad, owner of the Big Bay Point Lighthouse bed and breakfast in Michigan. Check out the website at bigbaylighthouse.com. And also, Erin Corra of the Friends of Lime Kiln Society. Check out the Lime Kiln Lighthouse centennial celebration that’s coming out on June 30. I hope those of you in that area will go to that. It sounds like a fantastic event. And of course, I want to thank my cohost today, Michelle Jewell Shaw. Anything you’d like to add, Michelle?

MICHELLE

I would like to add a couple of things. Jeremy. I’m hoping to see lots of people make it out to the lighthouse for our open houses. We’re open every Sunday now until Columbus Day from one to five.

JEREMY

That’s Portsmouth Harbor Lighthouse that is, in beautiful New Castle, New Hampshire, on our lovely New Hampshire Seacoast, and as always, thanks for listening and

MICHELLE

Keep a good light.

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